Abbadia San Salvatore

Abbey of Sant'Antimo


Albarese

Acquapendente


Archipelago Toscano


Arcidosso


Arezzo


Asciano


Badia di Coltibuono


Bagno Vignoni

Barberino Val d'Elsa

Beaches

Bolsena Lake


Bomarzo

Brunello di Montalcino

Buenconvento

Campagnatico


Capalbio


Castel del Piano


Castelfiorentino

Castell'Azarra

Castellina in Chianti


Castelmuzio


Castelnuovo Bererdenga


Castiglioncello Bandini


Castiglione della Pescaia


Castiglione d'Orcia


Castiglion Fiorentino


Celleno


Certaldo


Chinaciano Terme


Chianti


Chiusi


Cinigiano


Città di Castello

Cività di Bagnoregio


Colle Val d'Elsa


Cortona


Crete Senesi


Diaccia Botrona


Isola d'Elba


Firenze


Follonica


Gaiole in Chianti


Gavorrano

Gerfalco


Greve in Chianti


Grosseto


Lago Trasimeno


La Foce


Manciano


Maremma


Massa Marittima


Montagnola Senese


Montalcino


Monte Amiata


Monte Argentario


Montefalco


Montemassi


Montemerano


Monte Oliveto Maggiore


Montepulciano


Monteriggioni


Monticchiello


Monticiano


Orbetello


Orvieto


Paganico


Parco Naturale della Maremma


Perugia


Piancastagnaio


Pienza


Pisa


Pitigliano

Prato

Punta Ala

Radda in Chianti


Roccalbegna


Roccastrada


San Bruzio


San Casciano dei Bagni


San Galgano


San Gimignano


San Giovanni d'Asso


San Quirico d'Orcia


Sansepolcro


Santa Fiora


Sant'Antimo


Sarteano


Saturnia


Scansano


Scarlino


Seggiano


Siena


Sinalunga


Sorano


Sovana


Sovicille

Talamone

Tarquinia


Tavernelle Val di Pesa


Torrita di Siena


Trequanda


Tuscania


Umbria


Val d'Elsa


Val di Merse


Val d'Orcia


Valle d'Ombrone


Vetulonia


Viterbo

Volterra



 

             
 
Galgano Abtei2

N L      E N G

Eremo di Montesiepi, Abbey of San Galgano [1]


Surroundings
       
   


Abbazia di San Galgano,
The Abbey of San Galgano (Siena)


   
   

Saint Galgano (1148 – December 3, 1181[1]) is a Catholic saint from Tuscany. He was born in Chiusdino.
The canonization process to declare Galgano a saint started in 1185, only a few years after his death, and his canonization was the first conducted with a formal process by the Roman Church.[2] A lot of Saint Galgano's life is known through the documents of the canonization process in 1185[3] and other Vitae: Legenda beati Galgani[4] by anonymous, Legenda beati Galgani confessoris by an unknown Cistercian monk,[5] Leggenda di Sancto Galgano,[6] Vita sancti Galgani de Senis,[7] Vita beati Galgani.[8]

Galgano is said to have led a ruthless life in his early years, but later abandoned it in favour of a pious hermitage in the place now known as Rotonda di Montesiepi. His mother, Dionigia, is believed to have reported that Galgano had two visions, both involving Archangel Michael: in the first vision the Archangel told Galgano that he was going to be protected by the Archangel himself. In the second vision, Galgano was following the Archangel and they arrived to the hill of Monte Siepi where they met the twelve Apostles and the Creator himself. After the visions, it is said that Galgano's horse refused to obey his orders and led him on top Monte Siepi where his vision happened. Convinced that this was a sign, Galgano decided to plant a cross. Since he had no way to make one of wood, he planted his sword in the ground. The sword is said to have immediately became one piece with the ground so that nobody could remove it. A story says that in one of the visions, he was told to renounce material things. He, stating that it would be as hard as splitting a rock, decided to make his point by attempting to plunge his sword into one. The story goes on saying that the "stone yielded like butter".[9]

 

   
   

Enlarge map Abbey San Galgano and Eremo di Montesiepi

 

 
   

The sword in the stone at Montesiepi Chapel

The sword in the stone can be seen at the Rotonda at Montesiepi, near the ruins of San Galgano Abbey. The handle of a sword protrudes from the ground, and is said to be the sword of San Galgano.

A round church was built over the purported tomb, where pilgrims came in large numbers and miracles were claimed. In that year Cistercian monks took over Monte Siepi at the request of Hugh, bishop of Volterra, but most of Galgano's monks left, scattered over Tuscany, and became Augustinian hermits. By 1220 a large Cistercian monastery was built below Galgano's hermitage: they then claimed him as a Cistercian saint. His cult was lively in Siena and Volterra, where numerous representations survive. The ruins of his hermitage can still be seen, while his cloak is kept in the church of Santuccio at Siena.[10]

References

  1. His alleged date of death is December 3, 1181, but other scholars assign it to November 30, 1180. The Roman Catholic Church celebrates Saint Galgano on November 30, as ordered in 2004 by Pope Johannes Paul II.
  2. As reported by A. Vauchez in "La santità nel medioevo", Il Mulino, Bologna, 1989
  3.  Inquisitio in partibus, transcribed by Sigismondo Tizio in Historiae Senenses and transcribed in "Analecta Toscana IV; Der Einsiedler Galgano von chiusino und die Anfange von San Galgano" by Fedor Schneider (1914-1924).
  4.  Codice Laurenziano, 14th century
  5.  Codice di Siena, 15th century
  6.  Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, cod. Chigi M. V. 118, 15th century.
  7. Codice di Veroli, 15th century.
  8.  Codice Laurenziano, 15th century.
  9. Dhwty, [1]
  10. Oxford Dictionary of Saints/David Hugh Farmer 1997 Oxford University Press

 

 

Galgano Sword   Galgano Sala   San galgano fuori
San Galgano sword[1]  

Chapterhouse[1]

 

  Panorama dell'Abbazia di San Galgano (Chiusdino)[2]

[1] Photo by Adrian Michael, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported2.5 Generic2.0 Generic and 1.0 Generic license.
[2] Photo Vignaccia76, unter der Creative-Commons-Lizenz „Namensnennung – Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 nicht portiert“ lizenziert.